Tunisian Crochet Baby Book and Giveaway

I was recently asked to take a look at the new Tunisian Crochet Baby Book by Sharon H. Silverman. The book is published by Leisure Arts.
The book contains 8 pretty designs that highlight several different tunisian crochet stitches including cables, ripples, stripes, bobbles, and basket weave. Each design is separated from Easy to Intermediate.
From the Leisure Arts website:
“If you are new to Tunisian crochet, or need a refresher on the basics, the Tunisian Crochet Skills section will help you get started. Free online technique videos are also available”.
Sharon was interviewed by Cute Crochet Chat below. Some of our favorite designs from the book are highlighted during the interview.

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1     How did you learn to crochet and how old were you when you learned?
All sorts of crafts appealed to me when I was little. I made “horse rein” on what some people call a Knitting Nancy, did mosaics, made potholders, and so on. My mother taught me to crochet when I was 6 or 7 years old. She also taught me to knit, but I never felt as comfortable with that. Crocheting was always fun. I used some published patterns but also made up my own designs. I vividly remember using a K hook with two colors of blue yarn held together to make a shoulder bag.
 .       How long have you been a freelance crochet designer?
     I have been a freelance writer since 1988, and I switched from travel writing to crochet design in 2005.
      Are you a part time or full time crochet designer?
   Crochet design makes up the bulk of my current work. I also write a quarterly column, “Shop!” for The Hunt magazine (a Brandywine Valley lifestyle magazine), do public relations writing for several local museums and cultural sites, and pick up  other writing assignments occasionally. 
         How did you learn Tunisian Crochet?
     I discovered Tunisian crochet in a stitch dictionary while I was designing projects for my first crochet title, Basic Crocheting: All the Skills and Tools You Need to Get Started. I learned the basics from that book, then sought out other sources to extend my knowledge of the technique. It was really exciting to see the fabric that Tunisian crochet creates. I never liked projects with rivers of double crochet stitches—too loopy!—and Tunisian had a totally different look.
      Where did you get your inspirations for the afghans in this Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets book?
    Tunisian crochet lends itself to interesting textures and colorwork. I was inspired by those possibilities, and by my interest in bringing a contemporary color palette to today’s nurseries.
I also wanted to present projects at various levels of difficulty; people who were newer to Tunisian crochet would successfully make beautiful projects that would build their confidence, and more advanced crocheters could try something challenging and add to their skill set. The most complicated project in the book is “Bright Strands,” which uses stranded colorwork in vivid yellow, navy, and white. It’s rewarding to teach this technique through my pattern.
      What are your favorite kind of crochet projects to make and/or design?
    If I’m making something for myself, I like fitted garments as opposed to boxy ones. Crochet lace makes wonderful accessories like scarves and shawls.
    For design, it’s exciting to be inspired by the colors and patterns in nature and to translate that into a pattern that other crocheters can use. Blankets and accessories are the easiest from a practical pattern-writing standpoint, since each project needs instructions in only one size.  
7 \        Do you have a favorite weight or brand of yarn that you like best?
    Depends on the project. There are many excellent yarn companies, large and small, out there today. The products are such high quality, with a limitless selection of materials and colors.
     I love Egyptian mercerized cotton in lace weight for shawls and lightweight wraps, but I like DK and worsted weight yarn as well. I don’t gravitate toward bulky yarns as much, but I’ll try anything as long as it does not split or shed. Can’t stand fibers flying into my eyes and nose! 
8       Are you working on anything new at the moment?
   I just finished a book for Stackpole Books, Tunisian Crochet for Baby, which is scheduled for publication in September 2014. 
Thank you, Sharon, for such an interesting interview!
Sharon’s book can be purchased at the Leisure Arts website or on Amazon.
You can meet Sharon at her blog:
or her website:

www.sharonsilverman.com 

You can also find Sharon at Ravelry as: CrochetSharon
and on Facebook
Sharon Silverman Crochet
and Pinterest:
http://www.pinterest.com/crochetsharon/

As always, our readers have a chance to win a copy of this book. For a chance to win, please leave an email address (or some other way of contacting you!) in the COMMENTS. We will pick a random winner on 2/18/14. Without an email address, I cannot contact you in case you are the winner!
Good luck!

The review and giveaway copies of this book have been provided by Leisure Arts.

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Tunisian Crochet Baby Book and Giveaway

I was recently asked to take a look at the new Tunisian Crochet Baby Book by Sharon H. Silverman. The book is published by Leisure Arts.
The book contains 8 pretty designs that highlight several different tunisian crochet stitches including cables, ripples, stripes, bobbles, and basket weave. Each design is separated from Easy to Intermediate.
From the Leisure Arts website:
“If you are new to Tunisian crochet, or need a refresher on the basics, the Tunisian Crochet Skills section will help you get started. Free online technique videos are also available”.
Sharon was interviewed by Cute Crochet Chat below. Some of our favorite designs from the book are highlighted during the interview.

<!–[if !mso]>st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } <![endif]–>

1     How did you learn to crochet and how old were you when you learned?
All sorts of crafts appealed to me when I was little. I made “horse rein” on what some people call a Knitting Nancy, did mosaics, made potholders, and so on. My mother taught me to crochet when I was 6 or 7 years old. She also taught me to knit, but I never felt as comfortable with that. Crocheting was always fun. I used some published patterns but also made up my own designs. I vividly remember using a K hook with two colors of blue yarn held together to make a shoulder bag.
 .       How long have you been a freelance crochet designer?
     I have been a freelance writer since 1988, and I switched from travel writing to crochet design in 2005.
      Are you a part time or full time crochet designer?
   Crochet design makes up the bulk of my current work. I also write a quarterly column, “Shop!” for The Hunt magazine (a Brandywine Valley lifestyle magazine), do public relations writing for several local museums and cultural sites, and pick up  other writing assignments occasionally. 
         How did you learn Tunisian Crochet?
     I discovered Tunisian crochet in a stitch dictionary while I was designing projects for my first crochet title, Basic Crocheting: All the Skills and Tools You Need to Get Started. I learned the basics from that book, then sought out other sources to extend my knowledge of the technique. It was really exciting to see the fabric that Tunisian crochet creates. I never liked projects with rivers of double crochet stitches—too loopy!—and Tunisian had a totally different look.
      Where did you get your inspirations for the afghans in this Tunisian Crochet Baby Blankets book?
    Tunisian crochet lends itself to interesting textures and colorwork. I was inspired by those possibilities, and by my interest in bringing a contemporary color palette to today’s nurseries.
I also wanted to present projects at various levels of difficulty; people who were newer to Tunisian crochet would successfully make beautiful projects that would build their confidence, and more advanced crocheters could try something challenging and add to their skill set. The most complicated project in the book is “Bright Strands,” which uses stranded colorwork in vivid yellow, navy, and white. It’s rewarding to teach this technique through my pattern.
      What are your favorite kind of crochet projects to make and/or design?
    If I’m making something for myself, I like fitted garments as opposed to boxy ones. Crochet lace makes wonderful accessories like scarves and shawls.
    For design, it’s exciting to be inspired by the colors and patterns in nature and to translate that into a pattern that other crocheters can use. Blankets and accessories are the easiest from a practical pattern-writing standpoint, since each project needs instructions in only one size.  
7 \        Do you have a favorite weight or brand of yarn that you like best?
    Depends on the project. There are many excellent yarn companies, large and small, out there today. The products are such high quality, with a limitless selection of materials and colors.
     I love Egyptian mercerized cotton in lace weight for shawls and lightweight wraps, but I like DK and worsted weight yarn as well. I don’t gravitate toward bulky yarns as much, but I’ll try anything as long as it does not split or shed. Can’t stand fibers flying into my eyes and nose! 
8       Are you working on anything new at the moment?
   I just finished a book for Stackpole Books, Tunisian Crochet for Baby, which is scheduled for publication in September 2014. 
Thank you, Sharon, for such an interesting interview!
Sharon’s book can be purchased at the Leisure Arts website or on Amazon.
You can meet Sharon at her blog:
or her website:

www.sharonsilverman.com 

You can also find Sharon at Ravelry as: CrochetSharon
and on Facebook
Sharon Silverman Crochet
and Pinterest:
http://www.pinterest.com/crochetsharon/

As always, our readers have a chance to win a copy of this book. For a chance to win, please leave an email address (or some other way of contacting you!) in the COMMENTS. We will pick a random winner on 2/18/14. Without an email address, I cannot contact you in case you are the winner!
Good luck!

The review and giveaway copies of this book have been provided by Leisure Arts.

"50 Tunisian Stitches" Book and Giveaway by Darla Fanton

I am honored to have been asked to review the new tunisian crochet book, 
“50 Tunisian Stitches by Darla Fanton”, published by Annie’s Crochet.  
Darla is an incredible designer and has many, many pattern books to her credit over the years. She is also considered to be one of the premiere crochet teachers in our industry! I am so fortunate to call her my dear friend and colleague!

Some incredible features of this book:

  • If you have ever done Tunisian or taught Tunisian crochet it is sometimes difficult for beginners to see where they are supposed to insert the hook for the final stitch in the row.  To make it easier for beginners, Darla developed a method to mark the right spot.
  • A lot of other books teaching Tunisian Crochet say to carry unused colors of yarns up the side edge, but they don’t really tell you HOW to carry them. Darla gives detailed instructions (pages 31-33) on exactly how to do this.  Her method of carrying the yarn not only results in a neater appearance, it also stabilizes the edge!

I really love this Tunisian Crochet Book. The cover is bright and beautiful and I love browsing through all the beautiful colorful photographs of each stitch listed. It gives a nice closeup photo of each stitch. (see a sampling of photos below).
 If you are new to Tunisian crochet, the basic information in the beginning of the book has lots of color photographs to help you get started. The stitch dictionary starts with all the basic Tunisian stitches such as the simple knit, purl, reverse, extended simple stitch, double, full and twisted stitches and then moves onto the more intermediate ones. 
The directions seem clear and easy to understand. A diagram at the beginning of each new stitch shows you exactly where to start the new stitch. The book also includes four (4) ‘get-started’ Tunisian crochet patterns, including a keyhole scarf, a roll brim hat, a mobius shawl and a pretty wrap. Each design is made using worsted-weight yarn.

“50 Tunisian Stitches” can be purchased at Amazon

or 

at Annie’s Catalog.  

Maggie’s Crochet just posted some great photos of this book on Facebook also HERE.

Our readers have a chance to win a copy of this book. For a chance to win a copy of “50 Tunisian Stitches”, leave an email address (or some other way of contacting you!) in the COMMENTS; let us know if you have ever done Tunisian crochet before! We will pick a random winner on 2/7/14. Without an email address, I cannot contact you in case you are the winner!
Good luck!
2/7/14 WE HAVE A WINNER! Thank you to all who participated!
The review and giveaway copies of this book have been provided by Annie’s Crochet & Crafts. 

"50 Tunisian Stitches" Book and Giveaway by Darla Fanton

I am honored to have been asked to review the new tunisian crochet book, 
“50 Tunisian Stitches by Darla Fanton”, published by Annie’s Crochet.  
Darla is an incredible designer and has many, many pattern books to her credit over the years. She is also considered to be one of the premiere crochet teachers in our industry! I am so fortunate to call her my dear friend and colleague!

Some incredible features of this book:

  • If you have ever done Tunisian or taught Tunisian crochet it is sometimes difficult for beginners to see where they are supposed to insert the hook for the final stitch in the row.  To make it easier for beginners, Darla developed a method to mark the right spot.
  • A lot of other books teaching Tunisian Crochet say to carry unused colors of yarns up the side edge, but they don’t really tell you HOW to carry them. Darla gives detailed instructions (pages 31-33) on exactly how to do this.  Her method of carrying the yarn not only results in a neater appearance, it also stabilizes the edge!

I really love this Tunisian Crochet Book. The cover is bright and beautiful and I love browsing through all the beautiful colorful photographs of each stitch listed. It gives a nice closeup photo of each stitch. (see a sampling of photos below).
 If you are new to Tunisian crochet, the basic information in the beginning of the book has lots of color photographs to help you get started. The stitch dictionary starts with all the basic Tunisian stitches such as the simple knit, purl, reverse, extended simple stitch, double, full and twisted stitches and then moves onto the more intermediate ones. 
The directions seem clear and easy to understand. A diagram at the beginning of each new stitch shows you exactly where to start the new stitch. The book also includes four (4) ‘get-started’ Tunisian crochet patterns, including a keyhole scarf, a roll brim hat, a mobius shawl and a pretty wrap. Each design is made using worsted-weight yarn.

“50 Tunisian Stitches” can be purchased at Amazon

or 

at Annie’s Catalog.  

Maggie’s Crochet just posted some great photos of this book on Facebook also HERE.

Our readers have a chance to win a copy of this book. For a chance to win a copy of “50 Tunisian Stitches”, leave an email address (or some other way of contacting you!) in the COMMENTS; let us know if you have ever done Tunisian crochet before! We will pick a random winner on 2/7/14. Without an email address, I cannot contact you in case you are the winner!
Good luck!
2/7/14 WE HAVE A WINNER! Thank you to all who participated!
The review and giveaway copies of this book have been provided by Annie’s Crochet & Crafts. 

The New Tunisian Crochet Book Review

I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE crochet and all that it encompasses. I especially love reviewing new crochet books that come out on our market. I am lucky to have a wonderful library full of fun, interesting and informative knit and crochet books.
One of my favorite kind of books are technique books that teach me new things about crochet and other needlework art forms. When I received Dora’s new book “The New Tunisian Crochet” Contemporary Designs from Time Honored Traditions, by Dora Ohrenstein, “Interweave/F+W Media; $24.95.”,  I knew that I had hit the jackpot! Dora and Interweave have put together an incredibly beautiful and informative book!
“Wow”, is all I kept saying as I flipped through it’s pages. To say that Dora’s new book is beautiful is an understatement. It is not only a lovely book that I will always cherish, it has and is teaching me wonderful things about the art of Tunisian crochet!

Before I show you some of the actual designs in the book, I would like to discuss the overall text of the book itself.
Dora begins the book with a chapter entitled, “What is Tunisian Crochet”. It includes beautiful photographs, a brief history of Tunisian crochet and how it has been brought into the modern world. Another chapter discusses all you need to know to work Tunisian crochet including techniques, basic stitches, decreasing and increasing, working tall and textured stitches, changing colors and so much more! You learn how to make a swatch and there are many tips and tricks along the way. There is a chapter for special techniques and effects including working circles, combining Tunisian with regular crochet, Tunisian colorwork and even Tunisian entrelac. In a separate chapter on stitch patterns, there are 28 pages and 33 beautiful stitch patterns, all in beautiful color. The book concludes with projects for 11 stunning Tunisian crochet projects, from sweaters to easy smaller projects, as well as some home decor, designed by “some of crochet’s masters“. This book has everything you will ever need to get started and go way beyond learning about the art of Tunisian crochet. I will always treasure this beautiful book in my library!

Continue below to see a sampling of some of the projects in this book and read about how you can win a copy of this book from Interweave!

Below is a small sampling of some of the projects in the book.

Marisol Cardigan designed by Andrea Graciarena
Shantay Skirt designed by Doris Chan
Ariadue Sampler Throw designed by Lisa Daehlin
Natalia Scarf designed by Dora Ohrenstein
Sierra Bag designed by Margaret Hubert
Najmee Rug designed by Dora Ohrenstein

As you can see, there is quite a variety of projects in this book!
Would you like a chance to win a copy of The New Tunisian Crochet?  First make sure that you are a follower of this blog, then comment below which design above is your favorite. Please, PLEASE do not forget to leave me your email address. I cannot contact the winner without it!
One lucky winner will be drawn at random on April 10, 2013.You can also purchase a copy at a reduced rate at Amazon.

DISCLAIMER: Interweave/F&W Media provided the review copy and also the giveaway copy for this blog.

The New Tunisian Crochet Book Review

I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE crochet and all that it encompasses. I especially love reviewing new crochet books that come out on our market. I am lucky to have a wonderful library full of fun, interesting and informative knit and crochet books.
One of my favorite kind of books are technique books that teach me new things about crochet and other needlework art forms. When I received Dora’s new book “The New Tunisian Crochet” Contemporary Designs from Time Honored Traditions, by Dora Ohrenstein, “Interweave/F+W Media; $24.95.”,  I knew that I had hit the jackpot! Dora and Interweave have put together an incredibly beautiful and informative book!
“Wow”, is all I kept saying as I flipped through it’s pages. To say that Dora’s new book is beautiful is an understatement. It is not only a lovely book that I will always cherish, it has and is teaching me wonderful things about the art of Tunisian crochet!

Before I show you some of the actual designs in the book, I would like to discuss the overall text of the book itself.
Dora begins the book with a chapter entitled, “What is Tunisian Crochet”. It includes beautiful photographs, a brief history of Tunisian crochet and how it has been brought into the modern world. Another chapter discusses all you need to know to work Tunisian crochet including techniques, basic stitches, decreasing and increasing, working tall and textured stitches, changing colors and so much more! You learn how to make a swatch and there are many tips and tricks along the way. There is a chapter for special techniques and effects including working circles, combining Tunisian with regular crochet, Tunisian colorwork and even Tunisian entrelac. In a separate chapter on stitch patterns, there are 28 pages and 33 beautiful stitch patterns, all in beautiful color. The book concludes with projects for 11 stunning Tunisian crochet projects, from sweaters to easy smaller projects, as well as some home decor, designed by “some of crochet’s masters“. This book has everything you will ever need to get started and go way beyond learning about the art of Tunisian crochet. I will always treasure this beautiful book in my library!

Continue below to see a sampling of some of the projects in this book and read about how you can win a copy of this book from Interweave!

Below is a small sampling of some of the projects in the book.

Marisol Cardigan designed by Andrea Graciarena
Shantay Skirt designed by Doris Chan
Ariadue Sampler Throw designed by Lisa Daehlin
Natalia Scarf designed by Dora Ohrenstein
Sierra Bag designed by Margaret Hubert
Najmee Rug designed by Dora Ohrenstein

As you can see, there is quite a variety of projects in this book!
Would you like a chance to win a copy of The New Tunisian Crochet?  First make sure that you are a follower of this blog, then comment below which design above is your favorite. Please, PLEASE do not forget to leave me your email address. I cannot contact the winner without it!
One lucky winner will be drawn at random on April 10, 2013.You can also purchase a copy at a reduced rate at Amazon.

DISCLAIMER: Interweave/F&W Media provided the review copy and also the giveaway copy for this blog.

MEET THE DESIGNER – Vashti Braha

We are introducing a brand new feature here at Cute Crochet Chat! Periodically, we will be posting an interview with some of your favorite crochet designers! Today, we are lucky enough to have the incomparable  Vashti Braha with us! Vashti recently launched a new website with some incredible crochet designs for sale. After reading our interview, check out all the wonderful crochet patterns she has to offer!
1. HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN CROCHETING AND WHEN DID YOU FIRST LEARN?
My mother taught me when I was nine. She had started out a self-taught knitter, but as a young mother with two children under the age of three, she taught herself to crochet so that she didn’t have to worry about dropped stitches. Her grandmother’s crochet inspired her to learn. I instantly fell in love with crochet when I learned it. I felt like I was empowered to make anything that I could imagine.
2. IF YOU COULD SPEND A DAY WITH ANYONE, LEARNING AND SHARING ABOUT CROCHET,  WHO WOULD IT BE?
Ooo, that’s a tough one! I’m going to rule out those with whom I’ve already been able to do that. It would be James Walters or Annie Potter. Two very different people! It’s because of both the breadth and depth of each of their penetrating explorations into stitch structures and range of materials.
3. How did you become interested in actual designing in crochet?
Once I knew what crochet was, I don’t think there was a time when I wasn’t interested in designing. It just took me a long long time to find out how to go about it! I didn’t know that’s what I was doing all along. I found out six years ago by attending a CGOA conference and being asked to sell the designs that I was wearing.
4. Where do you get most of your inspiration from, for crochet designs?
Most often it’s from the challenge of solving a problem, and from specific crochet stitches. My fingers will start craving the feeling of a type of stitch in a type of yarn, and I’ll start getting a vision of the kind of fabric I want to end up with. The “Weightless Tunisian Stole” is a perfect example. I was driven by a specific fabric fantasy. Or take love knots. The stitch fascinates me and the space “inside” each love knot captured my imagination. The Love Knot Embracelet and the Lovepod Boa designs result from my daydreaming about the spaces as being places.
  
Currently a Weightless crochet-along is starting up in Crochetville HERE
5. Would you say that you have a particular design style?

If you mean an overall look and feel, I suspect I do by now but I’m not good at stepping back and looking at my stuff that way. I think of myself as doing a quirky range of different things, but one word editors have used from the beginning to describe my stuff is “breezy.” Maybe living in Florida influences my design style.
If you mean a particular approach, overall I seem to favor side-to-side construction, and mixing types of construction in one piece. Lately I’ve been on a “corner-start/on the bias” jag. I like unexpected ways to arrive at the same thing….or to arrive at an unexpected thing 🙂
6. Has your style changed at all since you first started crochet design?

I look at some early designs now and think, “Ah, yes, that was from my exuberant phase.” For example, “Lunar Window.” Back then I had just learned how to make chainless foundation stitches of any height. Meanwhile in the Crochet Partners forum, people were complaining about Fun Fur because it was difficult to work the first row into the foundation chains with that yarn. I figured, people would have more fun using their Fun Fur stash if they avoided using a foundation chain altogether. I used 3 colors of Fun Fur so that the color would change as the stitch heights changed.

I’m very fond of my early patterns and the way I went out on a limb sometimes. I had no idea what I was really in for when it came time to write up the patterns for them!
On the other hand, I feel like I’ve always used crochet to express everything, as my “mother tongue”, just like how I use English, and time seasons my skills and reveals new crochet vocabulary. Not sure how much that changes my style.
I sure don’t understand people who think they know all there is to know about crochet! Sometimes I hear this from people who learned how to knit and crochet and only seem to let themselves be challenged by knitting. For me, crochet is ever full of mystery. There’s plenty more to discover. I’m grateful for every day that I have the time and health and passion and funds to explore it!

8. Do you have a favorite pattern of your own design, either sold or self-published that you love the most?

I have a few kinds of favorites. When I succeed in designing something that is perfection in function, it’s a “go-to” pattern–the first thing I reach for and use all the time, like Quencher. When my current Quencher wears out, I will make another to replace it immediately. (To this day I’ve never succeeded in creating a go-to cardigan for my picky self, but I keep trying. It has to settle across my back neck and shoulders a certain way, allow freedom of movement, not feel heavy, be something that I want to make in every color, etc.)

Other patterns are my favorites because they express my spirit so much, such as Mermaid Shrug, Lovepods Boa, Crystal Jubilee Vest (and of course the infamous Chaps LOL). And then there are the ones I’m proud of because of the engineering: the Barcelona, Baroque Tabard, Tokyo Jacket (the first is a join-as-you-go side-to-side raglan with invisible lace seams; the other two are simple shapes with various features that give the illusion of shaping).

Crystal Jubilee Vest (to commemorate CGOA’s 15th Anniversary)


Barcelona Jacket (free pattern)

Baroque Tabard (free pattern)

Tokyo Jacket (free pattern)

9. How did you first become involved with the Crochet Guild of America?

I discovered the online crochet world shortly after I became a mom in 1999. It was heaven. (It’s still heaven!) I found out about CGOA and their Chain Link conferences from the first forum I ever joined, Crochet Partners. The first Chain Link conference I attended (for 1 day!) was in 2002 because it was held in West Palm Beach and I could drive to it. It was my first time away since having a baby. I was hooked from then on. My next conference was 2004, where I met Gwen Blakely Kinsler, the founder, and I learned all about the history of the organization; and I met Marty Miller, who told me about CGOA’s mentor program for Associate Professionals.
Here’s a photo of Marty and me at the CGOA design booth for the 2005 Chain Link conference: 


10. Most of our readers love learning about ‘breaking into’ the crochet design business. What advice or tips can you give other crocheters who are interested in such a venture?

If a crocheter would like to go professional, the best thing he or she could do is to crochet every day in an exploratory way. This accomplishes many things: you grow your skills which strengthens your designs; you develop a bank of design ideas so that you’re primed for when an editor puts out a call for design proposals or for when you’re ready to launch a pattern line, or put together a book proposal; and you get habituated to a productive routine. Try a new-to-you stitch pattern, or a hook size outside of your comfort zone, or a yarn with a different texture or fiber than you’re used to. It doesn’t have to be for a long period of time every day, but it’s even better if you keep a pen and design notebook nearby, get into an introspective/reflective zone, and start playing with hook and yarn. When you discover something, jot it in your notebook and save that swatch. Have little hang tags at hand so that you can label it with the hook size you used (get a box of them at any office supply store). Tape the swatch to the page, or if that’s not practical, write the notebook page number on the tag.
I keep colored pencils nearby too. I’ve learned about myself that I forget to experiment with colorwork, so after I experiment with a stitch combination, I try visualizing what would happen if I changed colors here and there, and I sketch for later.

11. What’s on your hook now?
Four things:

– A diamond-shaped vest/wrap shape experiment with an interesting picot mesh stitch pattern worked on the bias. This one’s suspenseful! I have no idea how it’s going to turn out.

– A beaded craft yarn version of “Frostyflakes,” a wide shallow side-to-side triangular wrap that I’ll be adding to my pattern website soon. I made a white one in mulberry silk yarn shop yarn, and I like to show my designs in yarns from both yarn shops and craft chain stores.

– A thing, which will be in a book. You can wear it. I can’t talk about it because I’m not the publisher 🙂

– Teaching a class on my popular “Satin Pillows Necklace” in a yarn shop inspired me to use my pale pink pearl strand to make a third one. It has a Ravelry project page:
Thank you Vashti, for an extremely informative and interesting Meet The Designer!!