New Crochet Hand/Wrist Warmers Pattern

I admired a pair of crochet Hand Warmers that were made by my dear friend and crochet pattern checker, Wendy. She was sweet enough to make a pair for me! Aren’t these adorable! See the cute little button on the top right? I love, love, love these hand warmers and I thought you would, also. So I asked Wendy to write the pattern down for you and she was gracious enough to do so. Thank you, Wendy! ♥
Wendy is one talented lady who checks and double checks all of the crochet patterns that I release at Too Cute Crochet. If it were not for her, I would not know if my crochet patterns worked out so well for everyone. And that knowledge is one of the most valuable contributions to my pattern business.
It is fun to think that Wendy is now creating her own crochet patterns! Didn’t she do a great job on this pattern? If you have any questions, let me know and I will send them to her. Enjoy! I will also be permanently posting this pattern at my free pattern site, Cute Crochet Chat Patterns. 

Crochet Wrist Warmers
Materials:  Caron Simply Soft worsted weight yarn (color of choice), H (5 mm) hook, sewing and tapestry needle, sewing thread for optional buttons, buttons (optional)
Gauge: H (5 mm) hook,  (sc, dc,  sc, dc) = 1 inch; 6 rows = 2 inches;
Instructions are written for Ladies Small. Medium and Large are in ( ). Wrist warmers pictured are Size Small
Row 1:  Ch 25 (29, 33); sc in 2nd ch from and hook and each ch across, ch 1, turn. (24, 28, 32).
Row 2:  Sc in first sc, dc in next sc, (sc in next sc, dc in next sc) across, ch 1, turn
Row 3:  Sc in first dc, dc in next sc, (sc in next dc, dc in next sc) across (your last stitch should always be a dc) ch 1, turn
Row 4:  Repeat Row 3 until piece measures 3 ½  (5 ½, 7 ½ ) inches long.
When piece reaches desired length, do NOT fasten off.
Rnd 1: Working in ends of rows, sc, dc, sc in first end of stitch, *sk next 2 ends of stitches,      (sc, dc, sc) in next end of stitch, repeat from * across; working around wrist warmer, sc in each sc (24, 28, 32), sc in ends of rows, sc in ea sc across (24, 28, 32). Fasten off.
 Matching stitches, fold piece in half lengthwise; with tapestry needle and matching yarn, sew first 7 (9, 11) stitches together, fasten off.
Skipping next 4 (5, 6) stitches for thumb opening, sew next 13 (14, 15) stitches together.
Fasten off.
Sew on buttons (optional). 
Copyright 2012 Wendy Cozby  All rights reserved.
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New Crochet Hand/Wrist Warmers Pattern

I admired a pair of crochet Hand Warmers that were made by my dear friend and crochet pattern checker, Wendy. She was sweet enough to make a pair for me! Aren’t these adorable! See the cute little button on the top right? I love, love, love these hand warmers and I thought you would, also. So I asked Wendy to write the pattern down for you and she was gracious enough to do so. Thank you, Wendy! ♥
Wendy is one talented lady who checks and double checks all of the crochet patterns that I release at Too Cute Crochet. If it were not for her, I would not know if my crochet patterns worked out so well for everyone. And that knowledge is one of the most valuable contributions to my pattern business.
It is fun to think that Wendy is now creating her own crochet patterns! Didn’t she do a great job on this pattern? If you have any questions, let me know and I will send them to her. Enjoy! I will also be permanently posting this pattern at my free pattern site, Cute Crochet Chat Patterns. 

Crochet Wrist Warmers
Materials:  Caron Simply Soft worsted weight yarn (color of choice), H (5 mm) hook, sewing and tapestry needle, sewing thread for optional buttons, buttons (optional)
Gauge: H (5 mm) hook,  (sc, dc,  sc, dc) = 1 inch; 6 rows = 2 inches;
Instructions are written for Ladies Small. Medium and Large are in ( ). Wrist warmers pictured are Size Small
Row 1:  For Size SMALL, ch 25;
For Size MEDIUM, ch 29;
For Size LARGE, ch 33;
sc in 2nd ch from and hook and each ch across, ch 1, turn. (S – 24 sc, M- 28 sc, L – 32 sc).
Row 2:  Sc in first sc, dc in next sc, (sc in next sc, dc in next sc) across, ch 1, turn
Row 3:  Sc in first dc, dc in next sc, (sc in next dc, dc in next sc) across (your last stitch should always be a dc) ch 1, turn
Row 4:  Repeat Row 3 until piece measures S – 3 ½  (M – 5 ½, L – 7 ½ ) inches long.
When piece reaches desired length, do NOT fasten off.
Rnd 1: Working in ends of rows, sc, dc, sc in first end of stitch, *sk next 2 ends of stitches,      (sc, dc, sc) in next end of stitch, repeat from * across; working around wrist warmer, sc in each sc (S – 24, M – 28, 
L –  32), sc in ends of rows, sc in ea sc across (24, 28, 32). Fasten off.
 Matching stitches, fold piece in half lengthwise; with tapestry needle and matching yarn, sew first S-7 (M-9, L-11) stitches together, fasten off.
Skipping next S – 4 (M – 5, L – 6) stitches for thumb opening, sew next S-13 (M-14, L-15) stitches together. Fasten off.
Sew on buttons (optional). 
Copyright 2012 Wendy Cozby  All rights reserved.

>50 Ripples Stitches Crochet Book Review and GIVEAWAY!

>

What a treat! A book devoted only to crochet ripple stitches! I love crochet stitch reference books. I have several different ones and the books that have beautiful color photos are my favorite.

As a designer who loves crochet stitch patterns, crochet stitch reference books can be so inspirational when contemplating my next design.

This new book, “50 Ripple Stitches” by Darla Sims and published by Annie’s Attic is definitely a book that you will want to add to your crochet stitch library. Since I learned to crochet, ripple stitches have been one of my favorites stitch patterns, especially in afghans and dishcloths. But I recently designed a women’s headband in a ripple chevron stitch (you can view it on the left sidebar), so wearables can be designed with these pattern stitches also! There is something magical about the variety of patterns that can be achieved just by changing the order of your basic ch, sc, and dc stitches! I think ripple stitches also remind me of quilt patterns, which I love! 

“50 Ripple Stitches” has such a variety of ripples with so many different stitch patterns!

Each listed Ripple Stitch has very detailed instructions. Each Stitch is named,  the Pattern Notes tell you how many colors are used in each sample, it outlines the Special Stitch for each pattern, then gives row by row instructions on how to duplicate the stitch pattern.

There are some incredibly UNIQUE and fresh Ripple Stitches in the book including

                                                                      SWEET DREAMS

 AND

                                                                         CURLIQUES

Some of my most favorites stitch patterns are:                            

                                                                       BODACIOUS

                                                                     LITTLE HEARTS

                                                                     PRETTY POSIES

Besides the ripple stitch patterns, this book includes:

  1. An illustrated Stitch Guide with stitch abbreviations,
  2. A yarn conversion chart, 
  3. A conversion chart for both United States and United Kingdom crochet stitches.

Some of the ripple patterns were familiar to me but most were ripple stitch patterns that I have not seen before, which is a great plus!


Annie’s Attic has generously supplied us with TWO books for our giveaway! In order to be eligible to win one of these books, become a FOLLOWER OF THIS BLOG in the left sidebar (if you have not already done so!) and leave a comment on this post.  Let us know if you have any crochet stitch reference guides and which one you like best! I am going to enjoy seeing all the responses! PLEASE, PLEASE don’t forget to leave your contact information and/or email address, so we can contact you if you are one of the winners!
Two (2) lucky winners will be drawn at random at the end of the contest!
I ♥ giving things away! Good luck!

50 Ripples Stitches Crochet Book Review and GIVEAWAY!

What a treat! A book devoted only to crochet ripple stitches! I love crochet stitch reference books. I have several different ones and the books that have beautiful color photos are my favorite.

As a designer who loves crochet stitch patterns, crochet stitch reference books can be so inspirational when contemplating my next design.

This new book, “50 Ripple Stitches” by Darla Sims and published by Annie’s Attic is definitely a book that you will want to add to your crochet stitch library. Since I learned to crochet, ripple stitches have been one of my favorites stitch patterns, especially in afghans and dishcloths. But I recently designed a women’s headband in a ripple chevron stitch (you can view it on the left sidebar), so wearables can be designed with these pattern stitches also! There is something magical about the variety of patterns that can be achieved just by changing the order of your basic ch, sc, and dc stitches! I think ripple stitches also remind me of quilt patterns, which I love! 

“50 Ripple Stitches” has such a variety of ripples with so many different stitch patterns!

Each listed Ripple Stitch has very detailed instructions. Each Stitch is named,  the Pattern Notes tell you how many colors are used in each sample, it outlines the Special Stitch for each pattern, then gives row by row instructions on how to duplicate the stitch pattern.

There are some incredibly UNIQUE and fresh Ripple Stitches in the book including

                                                                      SWEET DREAMS

 AND

                                                                         CURLIQUES

Some of my most favorites stitch patterns are:                            

                                                                       BODACIOUS

                                                                     LITTLE HEARTS

                                                                     PRETTY POSIES

Besides the ripple stitch patterns, this book includes:

  1. An illustrated Stitch Guide with stitch abbreviations,
  2. A yarn conversion chart, 
  3. A conversion chart for both United States and United Kingdom crochet stitches.

Some of the ripple patterns were familiar to me but most were ripple stitch patterns that I have not seen before, which is a great plus!


Annie’s Attic has generously supplied us with TWO books for our giveaway! In order to be eligible to win one of these books, become a FOLLOWER OF THIS BLOG in the left sidebar (if you have not already done so!) and leave a comment on this post.  Let us know if you have any crochet stitch reference guides and which one you like best! I am going to enjoy seeing all the responses! PLEASE, PLEASE don’t forget to leave your contact information and/or email address, so we can contact you if you are one of the winners!
Two (2) lucky winners will be drawn at random at the end of the contest!
I ♥ giving things away! Good luck!

THIS GIVEAWAY IS CLOSED. THANKS TO ALL WHO PARTICIPATED!

Knit a Dozen Plus Slippers by Amy Polcyn

I am so happy to be the fifth stop in the Blog Tour of Knit a Dozen Plus Slippers by Amy Polcyn and House of White Birches!

This is a great book of thirteen knitted slippers patterns by Amy Polcyn. There is something for every taste and skill level! Directions are given for three different sizes and the instructions are easy to follow and explained well. Following the review, Amy was gracious enough to answer some questions about her design work.

Brightly Beaded Moccasins is one of my favorite pair of slippers in the book. They look so comfortable and functional, but because of the added touch of seed beading, have just the right touch of elegance. The color pattern looks simple to do and is highlighted by contrasting beads that are sewn in place. What a nice addition!

Crochet Cafe: Can you explain the beading technique that is used on the finished knitted slipper? 
Amy: To keep it easy and to use the size beads I wanted,  I simply sewed the beads in place on the finished slipper, following the chart and using matching thread.  Alternately, you could string the beads on the yarns and knit them in as you go, but along with working the colorwork pattern at the same time this might be too “fussy” for some. If you choose to string the beads on the yarn, slightly larger beads may be required.

Crochet Cafe: Is there a special technique for changing colors in knitting?
Amy: I used a stranded colorwork technique for the toe of the slippers, similar to Fair Isle designs.  Carry the yarn not in use loosely along the wrong side of the work, and knit each stitch in the color shown on the chart.  To keep the work from puckering, be sure to avoid pulling the yarn tightly when making a color change.  This usually requires keeping the tension looser than you would normally. 

Another great pair of slippers in this book are Mary Jane Slippers. Mary Jane’s are one of my most favorite designs to crochet and having a fun, simple pattern in knitting is a great change of pace. Using variegated yarn, as shown in the photo, makes a simple garter stitch even more attractive!

Crochet Cafe: Would a beginning knitter be able to follow this pattern?
Amy: These and are an excellent choice for a beginner!  The slippers are worked in garter stitch throughout, so each row is knitted (no purling).  Although the short row heel may seem tricky for a new knitter with the “wrap and turn” instruction, it is simply a matter of moving the yarn between the needles, slipping the next stitch, and moving the yarn back. The bulky yarn and larger needles make this a fast project, so even a new knitter can be done in no time. For a more experienced knitter, it’s possible to whip these out in an evening.  I’m planning to make a few pairs of these for myself to use up some leftover yarn– Mary Janes are my favorite.

Crochet Cafe: Do you have a favorite way to cast on your stitches?
 Amy: My favorite cast on is the long tail.  I think it’s fast to work, easy, and gives a neat, fairly elastic edge.  I don’t like taking the time to calculate how long the tail needs to be before casting on, though, so I just overcompensate and cut off the excess when I’m done.  
Thanks, Amy! 
Knit a Dozen Plus Slippers can be purchased HERE
Be sure to check out the next stop on this blog tour tomorrow at:
Two Sticks and a Sheep by Amy Duncan 

AUGUST First Friday Freebie

I can hardly believe that our second First Friday Freebie contest is already here! For this month’s contest prize, we are giving away my four most popular patterns at Cute Crochet.
To be eligible to win, visit Cute Crochet at www.cutecrochet.com and pick out YOUR favorite pattern there. Leave a comment at the end of this post and let me know which pattern you chose as your favorite and why.
Please be sure to leave an email address so we can get in touch with you if you are the winner! If you do not wish to leave your email address in the comments section, post your comment and then send your email address to: contest@cutecrochet.com
A winner will be chosen at random on August 21, 2009.