Wrapped in Crochet – A Review

wrapped in crochet I love Kristin Omdahl’s Wrapped in Crochet book for many reasons, but especially because after reading her Introduction, I felt a special affinity with her. Kristin taught herself to crochet while overseas and expecting a baby. I, also, taught myself to crochet while stationed overseas and pregnant with my first child. Like Kristin, I was instantly hooked!
But that is where are similarities seem to stop. Kristin is apparently a math whiz and actually designed one of her first crochet accessories using the Pythagorean theorem! How cool!
Wrapped in Crochet is broken down into types of garments: Scarves, Wraps and Shawls. Scarves: each pattern uses a different or unusual pattern or technique, “including corkscrews, weaving, hairpin lace and more”. Every scarf would make a quick and wonderful gift.                                                  The Wraps included are comprised of so many different shapes in several different techniques. Some are made in all-in-one designs and others are join as you go. Most of the lovely wraps go ‘far beyond the simple rectangle.”
The shawl chapter is my favorite. They are seven beautiful designs in a wide variety of styles and silhouettes. Most are triangular but there is also a semi-circle and two circular ones. Throughout the book you have the opportunity to learn and crochet hairpin lace, tunisian crochet, broomstick lace crochet, back post clusters and double crochet, and foundation single and double crochet, as well as several other stitches. Instructions for all are, of course, written very well and include many diagrams and schematics. I love the fact that with almost every design, you will be able to learn a new stitch or new technique. From the back cover: “Created for beginning to intermediate crocheters, these one-of a-kind pieces invite you to take your crochet to the next level.”My favorite designs include: Starlet Boa Scarf, Tressa Scarf, Gali Infinity Wrap, Geisha Wrap, and Stella Shawl.
All in all there are 18 exquisite designs. Sheer loveliness!

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Wrapped in Crochet – A Review

wrapped in crochet I love Kristin Omdahl’s Wrapped in Crochet book for many reasons, but especially because after reading her Introduction, I felt a special affinity with her. Kristin taught herself to crochet while overseas and expecting a baby. I, also, taught myself to crochet while stationed overseas and pregnant with my first child. Like Kristin, I was instantly hooked!
But that is where are similarities seem to stop. Kristin is apparently a math whiz and actually designed one of her first crochet accessories using the Pythagorean theorem! How cool!
Wrapped in Crochet is broken down into types of garments: Scarves, Wraps and Shawls. Scarves: each pattern uses a different or unusual pattern or technique, “including corkscrews, weaving, hairpin lace and more”. Every scarf would make a quick and wonderful gift.                                                  The Wraps included are comprised of so many different shapes in several different techniques. Some are made in all-in-one designs and others are join as you go. Most of the lovely wraps go ‘far beyond the simple rectangle.”
The shawl chapter is my favorite. They are seven beautiful designs in a wide variety of styles and silhouettes. Most are triangular but there is also a semi-circle and two circular ones. Throughout the book you have the opportunity to learn and crochet hairpin lace, tunisian crochet, broomstick lace crochet, back post clusters and double crochet, and foundation single and double crochet, as well as several other stitches. Instructions for all are, of course, written very well and include many diagrams and schematics. I love the fact that with almost every design, you will be able to learn a new stitch or new technique. From the back cover: “Created for beginning to intermediate crocheters, these one-of a-kind pieces invite you to take your crochet to the next level.”My favorite designs include: Starlet Boa Scarf, Tressa Scarf, Gali Infinity Wrap, Geisha Wrap, and Stella Shawl.
All in all there are 18 exquisite designs. Sheer loveliness!

A Garden is a Friend You Can Visit Anytime

The post today is not about crochet, but it is about being creative in other ways. I love to garden almost as much as I love to crochet and knit. Since we moved to New York (I am originally from California), because of the seasons and the climate here, I have had to become more creative in my gardening techniques. I had also been wanting to give my house more ‘curb appeal’, so this past Spring my husband, son and son-in-law surprised me with this project: removing the boring evergreen bushes from the front of my house and building a beautiful wooden planter box!

First, using my son-in-law’s jeep, they pulled out the bushes from in front of the house. There were several of them!

Then they cleared the debris and excess soil. They also laid down black plastic under the soil to keep the weeds from poking through. You can also see the roots of one of the bushes in the left of this picture. They were huge!

When the were done clearing the area, they dug holes for the posts and began building my new flower box!

 You can see the flower box starting to take shape.

Here is the flower box completed!

We spent a wonderful afternoon planting flowers with our little ones.

My husband spent a whole weekend power washing the house and then repainted the old black shutters with burgundy paint. Now I have a house with curb appeal!

Here is my new flower box covered in flowers that are in full bloom! I love the new look that removing the old bushes and replacing them with flowers created! What do you think?

A Garden is a Friend You Can Visit Anytime

The post today is not about crochet, but it is about being creative in other ways. I love to garden almost as much as I love to crochet and knit. Since we moved to New York (I am originally from California), because of the seasons and the climate here, I have had to become more creative in my gardening techniques. I had also been wanting to give my house more ‘curb appeal’, so this past Spring my husband, son and son-in-law surprised me with this project: removing the boring evergreen bushes from the front of my house and building a beautiful wooden planter box!

First, using my son-in-law’s jeep, they pulled out the bushes from in front of the house. There were several of them!

Then they cleared the debris and excess soil. They also laid down black plastic under the soil to keep the weeds from poking through. You can also see the roots of one of the bushes in the left of this picture. They were huge!

When the were done clearing the area, they dug holes for the posts and began building my new flower box!

 You can see the flower box starting to take shape.

Here is the flower box completed!

We spent a wonderful afternoon planting flowers with our little ones.

My husband spent a whole weekend power washing the house and then repainted the old black shutters with burgundy paint. Now I have a house with curb appeal!

Here is my new flower box covered in flowers that are in full bloom! I love the new look that removing the old bushes and replacing them with flowers created! What do you think?

Circles and Squares Crochet Rug



Circles and Squares Rug
Circles and Squares Rug is copyrighted 2009 by Jocelyn Sass and Cute Crochet

You may print it for your personal use, but you may not copy, distribute it, or sell it.

Materials: Wool-Ease Thick & Quick by Lion Brand Yarn, 4 skeins (24 oz.)
#099 Fisherman; Pooch by Patons, 2 skeins #65008 Fleece; OR substitute Red Heart® Pomp-a-Doodle™ for the Pooch.
P (10mm) hook;
straight pins, tapestry and sewing needles; matching quilting thread;

Size: Rug measures 25 inches Wide X 38-1/2 inches Long

Gauge: P (10mm) = 2 pattern repeats (sc, dc) = 2 inches; 2 rows = 2 inches
Circle measures approximately 4 inches across
Square measures approximately 3-1/2 inches X 3-1/2 inches

RUG
Row 1: (wrong side) With Fisherman Thick and Quick, ch 45; sc in 2nd ch from hook, dc in next ch, (sc in next ch, dc in next ch) across,
ch 1, turn. (22 sc, 22 dc).
Rows 2-60: Sc in first dc, dc in next sc, (sc in next dc, dc in next sc) across,
ch 1, turn. (22 sc, 22 dc).
At the end of Row 60, do not ch 1. Fasten off.

RUG TRIM
With wrong side facing, join Pooch with a sc in any corner stitch. Make 2 more sc in same corner. Working around outer edge of Rug in ends of rows and in each sc, sc around outer edge of Rug, making 3 sc in ea of four corners. Join with a sl st to first sc.

CIRCLES (Make 5)
Note: Do not join rnds unless indicated. Mark first st of ea rnd.
Rnd 1: With Pooch, ch 2; 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook. (6).
Rnd 2: Working in Back Loops only, 2 sc in ea sc around. (12).
Rnd 3: Working in Back Loops only, (sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc) around. (18).
At end of Rnd 3, join with a sl st to first sc.
Fasten off.
SQUARES (Make 5)
Row 1: With Pooch, ch 6; sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in ea ch across,
ch 1, turn. (5).
Rows 2-5: Sc in ea sc across, ch 1, turn. (5).
At end of Row 5, fasten off.
Randomly place circles and squares on RUG as shown in photo. Pin in place. Using quilting thread and sewing needle, sew circles and squares in place.

Circles and Squares Crochet Rug



Circles and Squares Rug
Circles and Squares Rug is copyrighted 2009 by Jocelyn Sass and Cute Crochet

You may print it for your personal use, but you may not copy, distribute it, or sell it.

Materials: Wool-Ease Thick & Quick by Lion Brand Yarn, 4 skeins (24 oz.)
#099 Fisherman; Pooch by Patons, 2 skeins #65008 Fleece; OR substitute Red Heart® Pomp-a-Doodle™ for the Pooch.
P (10mm) hook;
straight pins, tapestry and sewing needles; matching quilting thread;

Size: Rug measures 25 inches Wide X 38-1/2 inches Long

Gauge: P (10mm) = 2 pattern repeats (sc, dc) = 2 inches; 2 rows = 2 inches
Circle measures approximately 4 inches across
Square measures approximately 3-1/2 inches X 3-1/2 inches

RUG
Row 1: (wrong side) With Fisherman Thick and Quick, ch 45; sc in 2nd ch from hook, dc in next ch, (sc in next ch, dc in next ch) across,
ch 1, turn. (22 sc, 22 dc).
Rows 2-60: Sc in first dc, dc in next sc, (sc in next dc, dc in next sc) across,
ch 1, turn. (22 sc, 22 dc).
At the end of Row 60, do not ch 1. Fasten off.

RUG TRIM
With wrong side facing, join Pooch with a sc in any corner stitch. Make 2 more sc in same corner. Working around outer edge of Rug in ends of rows and in each sc, sc around outer edge of Rug, making 3 sc in ea of four corners. Join with a sl st to first sc.

CIRCLES (Make 5)
Note: Do not join rnds unless indicated. Mark first st of ea rnd.
Rnd 1: With Pooch, ch 2; 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook. (6).
Rnd 2: Working in Back Loops only, 2 sc in ea sc around. (12).
Rnd 3: Working in Back Loops only, (sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc) around. (18).
At end of Rnd 3, join with a sl st to first sc.
Fasten off.
SQUARES (Make 5)
Row 1: With Pooch, ch 6; sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in ea ch across,
ch 1, turn. (5).
Rows 2-5: Sc in ea sc across, ch 1, turn. (5).
At end of Row 5, fasten off.
Randomly place circles and squares on RUG as shown in photo. Pin in place. Using quilting thread and sewing needle, sew circles and squares in place.